Yüz Bir Türk

In honor of our last Turkish lesson, I have decided to make my blog post a lesson of some sort. Over the last five weeks, we have had lessons by one of the fabulous Accent staff, Hande. None of us came into the lessons knowing any Turkish, so we started with the very basics.

The Turkish lessons that we received were very helpful.  We learned common phrases, numbers, letters, descriptors, fruits/veggies, objects, ect. While learning a second language seems nearly impossible to us (shout out to Jess and I), it comes natural to others (shout out to Lucy and Charlie). None the less, we are now able to say some very common phrases or at least recall some.

I did a little research on my own and here are some fun facts about the Turkish language:

  1. There are around 10–15 million native Turkic speakers in Southeastern Europe and 55–60 million in Western Asia.
  2. The earliest known Turkic inscriptions are the Orkhon inscriptions found in Mongolia.
  3. There are no masculine or feminine forms of nouns/adjectives, making it easier to learn.
  4. The basic word order of Turkish is subject, object, verb. Compare that to English, subject, verb, object.
  5. There are 5 fundamental tenses in Turkish. For the examples below, I will be using Geniş zaman (Simple Present Tense). Hopefully you can catch on to the sentence structure by the end of them.

The best day of the class, in my opinion, is when we learned simple activity phrases. We received the cutest worksheets, and coincidentally the characters had crazy resemblances to members of the class. Hopefully you found them as similar as we did.

Blog 1

  1. Natalia dusts. In Turkish, you would say “Natalia is taking dust.” The words necessary to create this sentence are Toz (Dust) and Aliyor (To take). Translation: Natalia toz aliyor.
  1. Frank vacuums places. In Turkish, you would say “sweep” rather than “vacuum”.The words necessary to create this sentence are Yerler (Places) and Süpürüyor (To sweep (vacuum)). Translation: Frank yerleri süpürüyor.

Blog 2

  1. Skyler washes the clothes. The words necessary to create this sentence are Kıyafetleri (Clothes) and Yıkıyor (To wash). Translation: Skyler kıyafetleri yıkıyor.­­­
  1. Megan irons the clothes. The words necessary to create this sentence are Kıyafetleri (Clothes) and Utülüyor (To iron). Translation: Megan kıyafetleri ütülüyor

Blog 3

  1. Madison feeds Yun. The word necessary to create this sentence is Besliyor (To feed). Translation: Madison Yun’u besliyor.
  1. Jordan feeds the cat. The words necessary to create this sentence are Kediyi (Cat) and Besliyor (To feed). Translation: Jordan kediyi besliyor.

Blog 4

  1. Megan walks the dog. There is more than one way to say dog in Turkish, either köpeği or köpek. We learned the translation “Megan strolls the dog” instead of “Megan walks the dog” because it is more common. The words necessary to create this sentence are Köpeği (Dog) and Dolaştırıyor (To stroll). Translation: Megan köpeği dolaştırıyor.
  1. Jenny listens to the radio. The words necessary to create this sentence are Radyov (Radio) and Dınlıyor (To listen). Translation: Jenny radyo dınlıyor.

Blog 5

  1. Jack listens to music. The words necessary to create this sentence are Müzik (Music) and Dınlıyor (To listen). Translation: Jack müzik dınlıyor.
  2. Lucy plays. The word necessary to create this sentence is Oynuyor (To play).Translation: Lucy oynuyor.

Blog 6

  1. Doug plays basketball. The words necessary to create this sentence are Basketbol (Basketball) and Oynuyor (To play). Translation: Doug basketbol oynuyor.
  1. Charlie practices the guitar. In Turkish, work can be used to say practice. The words necessary to create this sentence are Gitar (Guitar) and Caiışıyor (To practice (to work)). Translation: Charlie gitar çaiışıyor.

Blog 7

  1. Jess plays the piano. In Turkish, work is used to say practice. The words necessary to create this sentence are Piyano (Piano) and Caiışıyor (To practice (to work)). Translation: Jess piyano çaiışıyor.
  1. Peter studies. In Turkish, you say what Peter studies. For general studying, you could say lesson. The words necessary to create this sentence are Ders (Lesson) and Calışıyor (To study). Translation: Peter ders çalışıyor.

Blog 8

  1. Sam exercises. In Turkish, you could say “Sam is doing exercise.” The words necessary to create this sentence are Egzersiz (Exercise) and Yapıyor (Is doing). Translation: Sam egzersiz yapıyor.

Just for some more fun (in cause you aren’t having enough already), you should try to say this common Turkish tongue twister: Bir berber bir berbere gel berber beraber Berberistan’da bir berber dükkanı açalım demiş. (A barber told another barber “come barber, let’s start up a joint barbershop in Barberistan.)

Bak ne öğrendim anne! (Look what I learned Mom!)

Sana Hande teşekkür ederiz! (Thank You Hande!)

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